Category Archives: Social Determinants of Health

Our health is at the federal government’s discretion

In Australia the health of the general public, at  a population level, is in the hands of the federal government. They make decisions on the level of welfare payments, minimum pay, and legislation that affects job security and conditions. These … Continue reading

Posted in Social Determinants of Health

Challenging micro-aggressions against people living homeless through acts of acceptance

In my present project I began with research showing that homeless and other very disadvantaged people have poorer health and use fewer health services. I considered this in the context of the Social Determinants of Health (Marmot & Wilkinson), that … Continue reading

Posted in Homeless health, Research, Service entry, Social Determinants of Health, Vulnerable populations

‘System participants’ inform local action on hard to reach services

Equity of access to health services is a key goal for primary health care internationally and in Australia (WHO, 1978). The systems used to gain entry to health services can impede or facilitate access, engagement and health outcomes. Equity of … Continue reading

Posted in Research, Service entry, Social Determinants of Health, Vulnerable populations

Inadvertently locking out the most needy from health services

In 1971 Tudor Hart believed that the people who most needed health services were the least likely to receive them, and that turns out to be true. His ‘Inverse Care Law’ is valid today. Since then Marmot and Wilkinson have … Continue reading

Posted in Service entry, Social Determinants of Health, Vulnerable populations

Why we don’t act on health inequality

Wiser people than me have discussed our failure to act on what we now about the social determinants of health (Baum et al 2009, Katikireddi et al 2013). Poor health is located in social disadvantage and would need to be … Continue reading

Posted in Social Determinants of Health